Close

The Container List Blog

December 16, 2014

Have one

A great one from Tony Palladino, a cleaned-up and stripped-down version of the tear-off fliers that used to proliferate to such an extent that they almost became invisible. This Christmas card both grabs your attention and evokes nostalgia.

Have one Continue Reading Read more
May 16, 2014

Tony Palladino, 1930-2014

A tribute to the singular artist and designer.

Tony Palladino, 1930-2014 Continue Reading Read more
June 07, 2013

I can’t see my flag anymore

This detail from an anti-Vietnam war poster is represented only on a slide in the Tony Palladino collection. In serif text above the image, the original includes the complaint “I can’t see my flag anymore”—which has some of the same arch plainness or indirection of Chwast’s anti-war End Bad Breath poster of two years prior. Here’s another of various flags by Palladino, one graphic symbol whose permutations he remained fascinated by throughout his career. Despite its relative lack of exposure today, it is one of two Palladino posters in the Library of Congress.

I can’t see my flag anymore Continue Reading Read more
April 20, 2013

A stricter side of Palladino

Tony Palladino worked for Siegel & Gale in the mid-1970s — one of the accounts he worked on was Conrail, a new railroad organization created by the federal government.

A stricter side of Palladino Continue Reading Read more
April 08, 2013

Blechman Palladino for Architectural & Engineering News

Tony Palladino collaborated with R.O. Blechman in the 1960s. One of the best examples of their combined sensibilities appeared on their covers for Architectural & Engineering News.

Blechman Palladino for Architectural & Engineering News Continue Reading Read more
February 03, 2013

Text clean and tight, some tearing

Early in his career, Tony Palladino specialized in book jackets—his style was always restrained, and oscillated between primitive torn-paper graphics and highly simplified visual ideas.

Text clean and tight, some tearing Continue Reading Read more
July 18, 2012

Here comes the bride

In honor of summer wedding season we bring you Tony Palladino’s poster for “The Wedding Party.”

Here comes the bride Continue Reading Read more
July 03, 2012

Happy 4th from Tony Palladino

This hinged flag sculpture was originally designed for a cover of Second Coming magazine, but Palladino revisited the idea at intervals. One main conceit is that, on the reverse side, the Italian flag is painted, emphasizing his Italian-American roots. Click through for full magazine cover.

Happy 4th from Tony Palladino Continue Reading Read more
June 26, 2012

Sunday hats

Tony Palladino created this indelible image for an SVA poster in 1989.

Sunday hats Continue Reading Read more
June 06, 2012

Crowd control

Tony Palladino, along with Chermayeff & Geismar, was enlisted by Mobil to design the poster for Cotton Bowl advertisements in the late-80s and 90s. We don’t actually have this poster in our collection, though we have two others (which will follow shortly); only this slide of it. The others also make use of the visual appearance of a crowd as a way to play with perception of figure and ground. This slide didn’t go through properly the first time so I don’t have a good image of it, but if you click through I’ve included a smaller picture for reference.

Crowd control Continue Reading Read more
April 25, 2012

Palladino Perfectos

These Perfectos cigarette ads, designed by Tony Palladino in 1965, caught my attention because they’re so markedly different in style from the typical tobacco ads of the 1960s.

Palladino Perfectos Continue Reading Read more
August 27, 2010

Brown bag

More Tony Palladino: a clever concept hiding in plain sight.

Brown bag Continue Reading Read more
August 25, 2010

Color is for anything you want

This deceptively casual promotional piece typifies the whimsy and poignancy found in much of Tony Palladino’s work.

Color is for anything you want Continue Reading Read more
September 18, 2009

Another pitch from Palladino

About a decade before Tony devised his ‘guerilla marketing’ self-promotion campaign, the designer took a similarly witty but somewhat more traditional approach. Four versions of this card were printed, each in three colors on heavy stock, and sent to publishers without any additional pitch. Set simply with his address and isolating a single area of specialization, they relied on a single strong image to convey their point.

Another pitch from Palladino Continue Reading Read more
May 26, 2009

Guerrilla marketing

Palladino made a point of choosing business associates who would get the joke, and would recognize his initials, T.P. He also says he wouldn’t dare pull a stunt like this today.

Guerrilla marketing Continue Reading Read more
May 11, 2009

What good design was

More Tony Palladino at the Museum of Modern Art: “Tube Floor Lamp,” part of the museum’s permanent collection since 1968, is currently on view in the exhibition What Was Good Design? alongside objects by Charles and Ray Eames, Hans Wegner, Arne Jacobsen and Bruno Munari.

What good design was Continue Reading Read more
May 07, 2009

The object transformed

In the introduction to the exhibition’s catalogue (designed by Massimo Vignelli), Constantine describes the objects as “apparitions of everyday reality, complete with overtones of grim absurdity,” and suggests “for the 20th century they may be the most appropriate kind of still life.” Admission was $1.25.

The object transformed Continue Reading Read more
April 07, 2009

Tony Palladino’s Guide to Life

Here’s a 1957 poster by Tony Palladino. Substitute ’09 for ’57 and it still works. Click here for the full image.

Tony Palladino’s Guide to Life Continue Reading Read more
All names, logos, trademarks and/or copyrighted images are the property of their respective owners and their appearance on this site is merely intended to illustrate certain of the content available for educational purposes in the Milton Glaser Design Study Center and Archives of the Visual Arts Foundation and is not intended in any way to imply or suggest that the respective owners of these names, logos, trademarks and/or copyrighted images consent to, approve, endorse, sponsor, or intend to associate with the Visual Arts Foundation or any of its affiliates.